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Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Prognosis

Learn more about the prognosis for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Free Accutane Case Evaluation: If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with IBD as a result of taking Accutane, Amnesteem, Claravis or Sotret, you should contact our law firm immediately. You may be entitled to compensation by filing a lawsuit and we can help.

IBD Prognosis

While IBD can limit quality of life because of pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and other socially unacceptable symptoms, it is rarely fatal on its own. Fatalities due to complications such as toxic megacolon, bowel perforation, and surgical complications are also rare.

While patients of IBD do have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, this is usually caught much earlier than the general population in routine surveillance of the colon by colonoscopy, and therefore patients are much more likely to survive. New evidence suggests that patients with IBD may have an elevated risk of endothelial dysfunction and coronary artery disease.

The goal of treatment is toward achieving remission, after which the patient is usually switched to a lighter drug with fewer potential side effects. Every so often a flare-up of symptoms may occur. Depending on the circumstances, it may go away on its own or require medication. The time between flare-ups may be anywhere from weeks to years, and varies substantially between patients.

Do I have an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Lawsuit?

The Defective Drug & Product Liability Litigation Group at our law firm is an experienced team of trial lawyers that focus exclusively on the representation of plaintiffs in Accutane, Amnesteem, Claravis or Sotret lawsuits. We are handling individual litigation nationwide and currently accepting new cases in all 50 states.

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